Khoa Vo

SSL Certificates are small data files that digitally bind a cryptographic key to an organization’s details. When installed on a web server, it activates the padlock and the https protocol and allows secure connections from a web server to a browser.

An organization needs to install the SSL Certificate onto its web server to initiate a secure session with browsers. Once a secure connection is established, all web traffic between the web server and the web browser will be secure. When a certificate is successfully installed your server, the application protocol (also known as HTTP) will change to HTTPs, where the ‘S’ stands for ‘secure’. Depending on the type of certificate you purchase and what browser you are surfing the internet on, a browser will show a padlock or green bar in the browser when you visit a website that has an SSL Certificate installed.

Traditionally, we have to purchase an SSL Certificate from a trusted Certificate Authority. The yearly cost can be costly and it is not a good solution for personal use. But, there is another alternative called Let’s Encrypt. Let’s Encrypt is a free, automated, and open certificate authority brought to you by the non-profit Internet Security Research Group (ISRG). The Let’s Encrypt root keys (ISRG Root X1 & DST Root CA X3) are trusted by default in Chrome, Opera, Firefox, and Microsoft Edge. In this article, I will show you the easy way to install free SSL Certificate on your Linux CentOS 7.1 server with Apache web server running. Assume you logged in PUTTY as root user (if not you need to add

In this article, I will show you the easy way to install free SSL Certificate from Let’s Encrypt to your Linux CentOS 7.1 server with Apache web server running. Assume you logged in PUTTY as root user (if not, you need to add “sudo” before the command), please follow these steps

Step 1: We install certbot. Certbot is packaged in the EPEL (Extra Packages for Enterprise Linux) repository. To enable EPEL on your system and install Certbot, run:

Code

# yum install epel-release

# yum install python-certbot-apache

Step 2: Run certbot and follow instruction to have SSL certificate installed

Code

# certbot –apache

Step 3: The certbot will take care the rest for you automatically. Let’s Encrypt SSL certificate only lasts 90 days. Therefore, we need to set up cron or systemd auto-renewal by using this renewal command

Code

# certbot renew –quiet

That’s it! Enjoy the padlock for free each time you access your website using https protocol 🙂

 

 

Filed under: Featured, Linux, Security, Tutorials

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